SFCC’s on-site, fully accredited John Muir Charter High School offers Corpsmembers the opportunity to gain their diplomas. Since 2007, the number of Corpsmembers earning their high school diplomas has increased 300%, with the inspired teaching of the John Muir educators.

One of our main goals is to assist Corpsmembers in achieving their goal of High School graduation so they can access meaningful and sustainable work and education opportunities.

Our on-site John Muir Charter High School is a fully accredited California high school, providing daily classes designed for young adults who have had a tough time succeeding in traditional public high schools. Highly-skilled, energetic teachers work closely with each student, linking academics to work experience, and motivating students to earn their high school diplomas.

While Corpsmembers attend classes, they also learn lasting tools to support a life of achievement and stability:

  • Critical thinking
  • Self-confidence
  • Leadership
  • Goal-setting
  • Life skills

Career Counseling

SFCC’s career counselor meets with every Corpsmember regularly, ensuring that he or she:

  • Develops a resume and cover letter, reference sheets, and public speaking skills
  • Explores careers through career assessments and talking with professionals in a wide range of careers, through our Career Speaker Series
  • Receives on-going support, for one year after leaving the Corps

SFCC Alumni have gone on to jobs at the Solar City, Clear Channel Outdoor, San Francisco International Airport, Occidental Power, Ironworks union local #377 (apprentice), Carpenter’s local union #713 (apprentice), SF Department of Public Works, Allied Security, PG&E, S & S Trucking and SF Department of the Environment.

 

A high school diploma opens doors. High school graduates:

  • Earn on average 58% more than those without a diploma

  • Are healthier than their peers

  • Are half as likely to fall into poverty

Yet…

  • One out of four high school students in San Francisco does not graduate from high school
  • Fewer than three out of five of San Francisco’s African-American or Latino students graduate high school